New Blog Post: Trump: A New Climate of Doubt

globalwarmingtweet2The election of Donald J. Trump cast a long shadow over recent negotiations at the Marrakech Climate Change Conference (COP22).

Before the third blog post of the series “Global Challenges of Climate Change”, our guest contributor, William Hull, assesses the new climate realities of a Trump presidency, the potential consequences for the Paris Agreement, and the on-going climate actions of U.S. corporations and citizens.

William also considers, in this blog post, the opportunities left for China, the world’s largest emitter of greenhouse gases, and lingering questions concerning the future role of the U.S. in climate diplomacy. The blog post, entitled ‘Trump: A New Climate of Doubt’, is available here.

(Image credit: Donald J. Trump | Twitter)

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New Blog Post: On the US Presidential Election

23872390719_6a5c73e28b_hDonald John Trump’s victory in the 2016 United States presidential elections has shocked the country and the world. The offensive discourse that characterized the President-elect’s campaign has left the US starkly divided. Women and minorities are rightly concerned about their human and civil rights. Days and nights of protests have followed the electoral result.

The international community is also concerned about the implications of a foreign policy that would be characterized by stalwart insularity and disengagement from the political, economic, and military alliances and strategies that the US has nurtured since the end of World War II.   

Co-founder Miguelángel Verde Garrido explains, in this blog post, what are the potential implications of President-elect Trump’s victory to democracy, the state of the union, and human and civil rights in the US, as well as some of the potential implications of the Trump administration for global politics. The blog post, entitled ‘Time to be Brave in the Land of the Free’, is available here.

(Photo credit: Chris Piascik | Flickr)

New Blog Posts: On the Brexit

flickr | freestocks orgFor the first time in the history of the European Union, a member state is set to leave the organization. The novelty of United Kingdom’s withdrawal, better known as Brexit, has left many in the European and international community puzzled as to the causes of the referendum results and the political and economic implications of this situation.

Co-founder Miguelángel Verde Garrido analyzes, in two blog posts, various aspects of the Brexit. The first blog post offers an overview of the main social and political facts of the referendum campaigns and results. In the second blog post, Miguel discusses the main reasons for the Brexit and places the issue in a wider context. He argues that the referendum results should be a lesson for every liberal democracy that is failing to deliver its promises and where citizens have forgotten the importance and consequences of their civic responsibilities.

The first part, ‘Brexit, A Web Of Lies, And A Disunited Kingdom’, is available here, and the second part, ‘Lesson Learned: Brexit Was About Much More Than The EU’, is available here.

(Photo credit: freestocks org | Flickr)

New Blog Post: Climate Finance – Shifting for a Fix

23625949416_54e933fdff_kIn the second blog post of the series “Global Politics of Climate Change“, our guest contributor, William Hull, sheds light on the most recent developments in climate finance. This is one of the trickier points in climate negotiations, which has historically represented a challenge in cooperation between developed and developing countries.

William explains, in this blog post, how this issue was tackled during the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris (COP21) while looking at the next steps in the build-up to the Marrakesh Climate Change Conference (COP22) later this year. The blog post, entitled ‘Climate Finance: Shifting for a Fix’, is available here.

The next blog post in the series will focus on climate action and sustainable development.

(Photo credit: Takver | Flickr)

Blog Post Series: Global Politics and Climate Change

The Berlin Forum on Global Politics welcomes the newest contributor to our blog, William Hull, who will write a blog post series on the global politics of climate change throughout the next months, and address a range of topics, from international negotiations and climate finance to sustainable development and security.

William launches the blog post series with a discussion about the significance of the 2015 Paris Agreement on Climate Change as well as the challenges lying ahead in terms of implementation and verification. The blog post, entitled ‘Maintaining the Momentum after the Paris Agreement: The Distance We’ve Come and the Distance Yet to Go’ is available here.

The next blog post in the series will focus on climate finance and be published in June/July.

New Blog Post: TTIP and Sovereignty

TTIPOur blog post series on sovereignty and global politics comes to a close with an analysis by co-founder Daniel Cardoso on the relationship between trade and sovereignty today. Daniel argues that, when free trade agreements like the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) are used to advance at all costs the privileges of dominant world forces, sovereignty remains a necessary tool to manage globalization, protect the public interest, and guarantee citizens’ rightful participation in public policymaking.

The blog post, entitled ‘How TTIP Threatens State Sovereignty and Why We Should Be Concerned’, is available here.

(Photo credit: European External Action Service | Flickr)

New Blog Post: “All your Internet are Belong to Us”

283894146_df1150c0d8_oWe continue our blog post series on sovereignty and global politics with co-founder Miguelángel Verde Garrido‘s analysis of sovereignty in relation to information and communications technology, which argues that proposals for technological and information sovereignty would do little to defend from, for example, mass surveillance, and concludes further efforts to establish global governance would better serve to confront nation states’ challenges regarding the Internet.

The blog post, entitled ‘“All your Internet are Belong to Us”: On Nation States’ Claims of Sovereignty over ICT Architecture and Contents’, is available here.

(Photo credit: Imamon | Flickr)