Blog Post Series: Sovereignty and Global Politics

leviathan detailThe Berlin Forum on Global Politics is glad to share a blog post series, which will focus on the topic of sovereignty and global politics. Capital, information, goods and people move around the world at incredible speed and in vast numbers. As globalization widens and deepens, regional and global forms of governance attempt to handle the issues and challenges of our times. Against this background, the blog series inquires about the role of sovereignty today: in which ways does this long-standing concept continue to matter?

Stemming from discussions held within the Center for Global Politics (CGP) Alumni Association and inspired by the reflections and work of Prof. Klaus Segbers (Director of the CGP at the Freie Universität Berlin) on this topic, the authors address the role of sovereignty in three areas of global governance: finance, the Internet, and trade.

We will publish a blog post each week, starting today with co-founder Marc Venhaus’ analysis of sovereignty in relation to international financial markets in the post-2008 economic crisis, entitled ‘Sovereignty over Capital Controls: From Orthodoxy to Heresy… and Back Again?’. The blog post is available here.

(Photo credit: Frontispiece from Thomas Hobbes’ 1651 ‘Leviathan’ | United States Library of Congress)

New Blog Post: ‘Failing to Provide Asylum’

Bengin Ahmad | FlickrCo-founders Daniel Cardoso and Miguelángel Verde Garrido discuss the ongoing refugee crisis in Europe in this post. They argue that the (mis)management of the refugee crisis by the European Union and European governments has little to do with the extent of the challenge and more with being compromised by institutional and identity crises.

The blog post is the start to a series of events, activities, and materials that the Berlin Forum on Global Politics will organize in order to discuss the ongoing refugee crisis.

The post, entitled ‘Failing to Provide Asylum: Why Europe Cannot Manage the Refugee Crisis’, is available here.

(Photo credit: Bengin Ahmad | Flickr)

Drawing Lessons from NAFTA to Better Understand TTIP

The Berlin Forum on Global Politics (BFoGP) discussed the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), on Saturday, May 2, from 19:00, at the Rosa-Luxemburg Stiftung in Berlin.

14391291462_2bf9964dd5_bThe event, organized by Mexico Via Berlin, sought to analyze the similarities and differences between TTIP and the North-Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), established in 1994 by the United States (US), Canada and Mexico. Prof. Nayar López Castellanos, from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), looked at NAFTA and its consequences while we focused on TTIP. Together we discussed how the case of NAFTA can help us anticipate the type of implications that a free trade agreement like TTIP can carry, not only for the US and the EU, but also for third countries.

We are always expanding our partnerships so as to involve more institutions and people in our projects. Our latest collaboration partner was Jonathan Florez, Berlin-based photographer and citizen journalist, who documented the event and captured, through images, the audience’s conclusions about the debate.

This event was part of a seminar series, organized by Mexico Via Berlin, which examined the work done in the context of the Mexican chapter of the Permanent Peoples Tribunal (PPT). Further information about the event and about the seminar series can be found here: http://mexicoviaberlin.org/

Language: English and Spanish

(Photo credit: EFF Photos | Flickr)

Further Outcomes of the ‘First Berlin Forum on Global Politics’

The Berlin Forum on Global Politics (BFoGP) is pleased to announce that two of the young scholars who presented their research at the ‘First Berlin Forum on Global Politics’ in April, 2013, have gone on to further develop the work they presented at the conference. Leon Schreiber published his paper in a journal publication and Leonard Hessling shared the content of his paper as a Prezi presentation, available online to the general public.

Leon Schreiber, whose research paper was titled Institutions and Social Policy: The Case of the Child Support Grant in South Africa, went on to submit the results of his research to the South African Journal of Political Studies (Politikon). Once reviewed, it was subsequently published on April 14, 2014.

Leonard Hessling, whose research paper was titled Water in the Arab Spring: The Human Rights to Water and Sanitation in the MENA Region’s Transition to Democracy, went on to make further presentations of the results of his research at international conferences, such as the European Conference on African Studies in Lisbon, which took place on June 29, 2013. Since then, he has made the content of his paper available as a Prezi presentation

The Berlin Forum on Global Politics wishes these two young scholars well in their academic endeavours and is pleased to have been able to open spaces for the discussion of their valuable and interesting academic research.