Building a Coalition to Further Democracy

Shepard-DefendDignityDuring the last two months, the Berlin Forum on Global Politics has worked with a broad and diverse coalition of organizations and individuals to understand, explain, and confront the threats to democratic institutions and values, socio-cultural diversity, and the stability of global politics that are posed by the resurgence of far-right populism, discriminatory political discourses, and authoritarianism within Europe and the rest of the world.

Our collective efforts have only started, but we invite you – to that effect – to participate, today and throughout the weekend, in peaceful demonstrations that will be held in every state of the United States and in more than 30 countries across the world.

Come and voice your solidarity with women’s rights, affordable health care, and equal pay, and your rejection of far-right populism and its divisive politics of hatred and insularity.

Please read more on the demonstrations that will be held in Berlin today and tomorrow; on those that will also be held in European capitals today; and, on those that will be held in the US today and throughout the weekend.

Come and help us shape the future!

(Photo credits: Shepard Fairey | The Amplifier Foundation)

Blog Post Series: Global Politics and Climate Change

The Berlin Forum on Global Politics welcomes the newest contributor to our blog, William Hull, who will write a blog post series on the global politics of climate change throughout the next months, and address a range of topics, from international negotiations and climate finance to sustainable development and security.

William launches the blog post series with a discussion about the significance of the 2015 Paris Agreement on Climate Change as well as the challenges lying ahead in terms of implementation and verification. The blog post, entitled ‘Maintaining the Momentum after the Paris Agreement: The Distance We’ve Come and the Distance Yet to Go’ is available here.

The next blog post in the series will focus on climate finance and be published in June/July.

#TTIPLeaks: Greenpeace Leaked 248 Pages of TTIP Documents Today

florez - ttip demo 004Today, Greenpeace Netherlands released 248 pages of leaked documents from the secretive negotiations of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), the proposed free trade agreement between the United States (US) and European Union (EU). The leaked documents cover 13 chapters that address topics from telecommunications to regulatory cooperation, from pesticides, food and agriculture to trade barriers, the US’ position, and internal EU documents that outline the “tactical state of play of the TTIP negotiations”.

When we published ‘The Transatlantic Colossus: Global Contributions to Broaden the Debate on the EU-US Free Trade Agreement’ in December 2013, our intention – as is the case with Greenpeace – was to draw public attention to the wide range of political, economic, and social implications that the proposed agreement could have on the everyday lives of US and EU citizens as well as on the rest of the world. Nowadays, more than ever, as civil societies on both sides of the Atlantic have voiced their concerns about TTIP and other agreements (i.e., TPP, CETA, and TiSA), it is important to continue broadening the debate with objective information and reliable analyses that include academics, experts, and civil society.

You can read and download the released documents at the dedicated #TTIPLeaks website.

Although we have dedicated and will continue to dedicate efforts to TTIP, we have also started to cover other topics, sharing our understanding on why the EU is failing to provide asylum to refugees, publishing a blog post series on sovereignty and global politics (i.e., in relation to financial markets, the Internet, and trade), and addressing some of the reasons behind environmental disasters. For this reason, we will soon welcome a new contributor to our blog, who will write a series of blog posts on the global politics of climate change and environmental diplomacy.

We will be announcing the launch of the blog post series on global politics of climate change promptly! For now, we leave you to consider how, despite the success of the Paris Agreement, the TTIP negotiations show that trade authorities within the EU and the US may not be as committed as the rest of their polities to seriously addressing the challenges of climate change and upholding environmental standards.

(Photo credit: Berlin Forum on Global Politics & Jonathan Florez | BFoGP)

New Blog Post: TTIP and Sovereignty

TTIPOur blog post series on sovereignty and global politics comes to a close with an analysis by co-founder Daniel Cardoso on the relationship between trade and sovereignty today. Daniel argues that, when free trade agreements like the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) are used to advance at all costs the privileges of dominant world forces, sovereignty remains a necessary tool to manage globalization, protect the public interest, and guarantee citizens’ rightful participation in public policymaking.

The blog post, entitled ‘How TTIP Threatens State Sovereignty and Why We Should Be Concerned’, is available here.

(Photo credit: European External Action Service | Flickr)

New Blog Post: “All your Internet are Belong to Us”

283894146_df1150c0d8_oWe continue our blog post series on sovereignty and global politics with co-founder Miguelángel Verde Garrido‘s analysis of sovereignty in relation to information and communications technology, which argues that proposals for technological and information sovereignty would do little to defend from, for example, mass surveillance, and concludes further efforts to establish global governance would better serve to confront nation states’ challenges regarding the Internet.

The blog post, entitled ‘“All your Internet are Belong to Us”: On Nation States’ Claims of Sovereignty over ICT Architecture and Contents’, is available here.

(Photo credit: Imamon | Flickr)

Blog Post Series: Sovereignty and Global Politics

leviathan detailThe Berlin Forum on Global Politics is glad to share a blog post series, which will focus on the topic of sovereignty and global politics. Capital, information, goods and people move around the world at incredible speed and in vast numbers. As globalization widens and deepens, regional and global forms of governance attempt to handle the issues and challenges of our times. Against this background, the blog series inquires about the role of sovereignty today: in which ways does this long-standing concept continue to matter?

Stemming from discussions held within the Center for Global Politics (CGP) Alumni Association and inspired by the reflections and work of Prof. Klaus Segbers (Director of the CGP at the Freie Universität Berlin) on this topic, the authors address the role of sovereignty in three areas of global governance: finance, the Internet, and trade.

We will publish a blog post each week, starting today with co-founder Marc Venhaus’ analysis of sovereignty in relation to international financial markets in the post-2008 economic crisis, entitled ‘Sovereignty over Capital Controls: From Orthodoxy to Heresy… and Back Again?’. The blog post is available here.

(Photo credit: Frontispiece from Thomas Hobbes’ 1651 ‘Leviathan’ | United States Library of Congress)